November 29th, 2018

Document Your Artwork Like A Pro

Published in RAW Features

By: Jaden Brodie

Do your work justice! You put a lot of effort into creating artwork, now capture it in the best possible light. Form beautiful images that compel attention and make people want to keep scrolling on your Instagram or website.

Seeing as how the internet is instrumental in getting your work out there, digital photos are likely the first thing a potential new fan or buyer will see of yours. One click of the camera affects how they react when they see your photos. Will you catch their eye or not? That’s up to how you present your work.

Tips:

1. Use the highest resolution camera that’s available to you. Higher resolution links to higher quality images which reflects on professionalism. A DSLR may be ideal but a smartphone camera paired with the following considerations also works great for digital purposes. Just steer clear of forward-facing cameras which produce notoriously poor quality images.

2. Composition is key! Letting the work speak for itself is a great approach here. Filling the frame with your artwork in a straight on shot allows the viewer to see it in its truest form. This could also be your opportunity to get creative and add complimentary props. What’s in the picture is just as important as what isn’t in the picture so make sure to remove any clutter from view.

3. Shoot in a well lit space to show your true colors. Open your curtains during the day and use natural light to its full potential. If you switch on lamps or ceiling lights, check that your white balance is adjusting correctly to prevent yellow tint from altering your hand-selected colors. Move yourself or your art if you get a shadow or glare.

Now that you have the tools and conditions to take a good photo, all that’s left is to get your artwork into focus and press the shutter-release button. Turn to a tripod if you’re working in low light or filming. And voila! You have a great photo of your amazing artwork to post online!

Bonus points for fine tuning colors, levels, and crop with photo editing software like Lightroom or Photoshop but it shouldn’t be necessary after a well planned shoot.